Sewing Machine Types 101

in Sewing

 

Sewing machines are designed for different sewing techniques ranging from basic stitches, creating garments, to more complicated projects like embroidery. There's no point in buying a complicated machine if you'll only be using it for simple clothing repairs. So, it's important to know and understand the different sewing machine types to save yoruself from purchasing one that won't be useful for you. 
 
Mechanical
 
This type of sewing machine is ideal for the occasional sewer and for beginners who wish to learn how to sew. It's often used for basic sewing techniques such as simple repairs and stitching hems. A mechanical sewing machine is mostly controlled by the rotary wheel. It requires guiding the fabric under the needle while moving the wheel to make a straight stitch. Adjustments in length and width can be made by using manual controls such as  levers, switches, and dials. 
 
Electronic
These are also suitable for beginners and occasional sewers who wants a sewing machine that does not require a lot of manual controls. Unlike mechanical sewing machines, an electronic sewing machine does not require you to guide the fabric using your hands. It uses an electrical impulse to make the needle and feeding mechanism work. It also has a foot pedal you can use to control the machine's sewing speed. Adjustments can be selected by using the dial. 
 
Computerized
 
This is best suited for experienced sewers who want a more convenient tool. It has a touchpad and LCD screen to make selections and adjustments much easier for the user. The great thing about a computerized sewing machine is that it memorizes past work such as the stitch you frequently use or the buttonhole setting you want to repeat. This can be connected to your computer, allowing you to download programs. The electronic sewing machine also offers a number of different stitches you can choose from. 
 
Overlocker
 
Overlockers are also known as “sergers”. These are mainly used for stitching hems, creating a finished seam, and trimming and enclosing edges. All of these can be done in just one step. Sounds convenient right? However,  it is not as versatile as the other sewing machines mentioned above. So, you'll also have to use another machine to perform other sewing techniques such as making buttonholes and inserting zips. 
Author Box
Monica Diaz has 36 articles online

Monica likes reading and writing about sewing machine tips. She also enjoys doing simple sewing projects during her free time.  

Add New Comment

Sewing Machine Types 101

Log in or Create Account to post a comment.
     
*
*
Security Code: Captcha Image Change Image
Related searches:

Sewing Machine Types 101

This article was published on 2011/08/30